Automate Excel http://www.automateexcel.com Excel Tutorial Thu, 18 Jan 2018 18:47:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 EXCEL TUTORIAL- Test if Cell Contains Specific Value http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/cell-contains-specific-value http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/cell-contains-specific-value#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2016 03:14:45 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8343 In this tutorial you will learn how to test if a range contains a specific value. COUNTIF Function In Excel, the COUNTIF function is used to determine if a value exists in a range of cells. The general formula for the COUNTIF is as follows: =COUNTIF(range, criteria) Range is the group of cells [...]

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In this tutorial you will learn how to test if a range contains a specific value.

COUNTIF Function

In Excel, the COUNTIF function is used to determine if a value exists in a range of cells. The general formula for the COUNTIF is as follows:

=COUNTIF(range, criteria)

Range is the group of cells that you want to count. They can contain numbers, arrays, be named, or have references that contain numbers.

Criteria is a number (5), expression (>5), cell reference (A9), or word (Knights) that determines which cells to count.

We will use the COUNTIF function to solve the following example.

Example: Countif Cells Contain Certain Text

Suppose a school wants to change their team mascot. They give 6 different options to student council officials and decide that only mascots with more than 4 votes will be considered. What mascots will the school consider?

Part 1) First we have to have to determine how many votes each mascot got. To do so we use the following formula:

=COUNTIF(Mascots, A9)
votes-per-mascot

Range E9:E23 was renamed to “Mascots” for simplicity purposes using a Named Range

This will count the number of cells in the list of Mascots that match the value of A9. The result is 5. To quickly fill in the remaining cells you can simply select the cell that you want to use as a basis and drag the fill handle fill-handle.

Alternative Expressions for the formula used

  • =COUNTIF(E9:E23, “Knights”) Will count the number of cells with Knights in cells E9 through E23. The result is 5.
  • =COUNTIF(E9:E23, “?nights”) Will count the number of cells that have exactly 7 characters and end with the letters “nights” in cells E9:E23. The question mark (?) acts as a wildcard to replace an individual character. The result is 5.
  • =COUNTIF(E9:E23,”<>”&”Knights”) Will count the number of cells in the range E9 through E23 that don’t contain Knights. The result is 10.

Part 2) Next, we have to determine which mascots received more than 4 votes. To do so we will use the COUNTIF function to run a simple TRUE or FALSE test.

=COUNTIF(Mascots, A9)>4

countif true or false

This formula will produce the answer TRUE if the desired mascot appears in the range more than 4 times and FALSE if it appears less than or equal to 4 times. Once again we can select the cell that we want to use as a basis and drag the fill handle fill handle in order to fill the remaining cells.

Manipulating the COUNTIF Function

We can also wrap the formula inside an IF statement in order to produce a result different than TRUE or FALSE.

=IF(COUNTIF(Mascots,A9)>4,”Consider”,”Reject”)

countif consider of reject

Instead of producing the result TRUE or FALSE, this formula will cause Excel to produce the result Consider or Reject.

COUNTIFS Function with Multiple Criteria

Once you learn how to use the COUNTIF function with one range and criteria, it is easy to use it for two or more range/criteria combinations. When testing if a range contains multiple values we must use the COUNTIFS function.

EXAMPLE

Let’s say we have a list of car parts ordered. We want to count the number of times a car part was ordered for its corresponding vehicle.

countifs car parts

By using the general formula:

=COUNTIFS(range1,criteria1,range2,criteria2)

We are able to determine where both criteria are matched in their respective columns. Let it be noted that the two criteria ranges must be the same shape and size or the formula will not work.

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Insert Dates in Excel http://www.automateexcel.com/how-to/insert-dates-in-excel http://www.automateexcel.com/how-to/insert-dates-in-excel#comments Sat, 23 Jul 2016 21:28:58 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8381 This tutorial covers how to insert dates in Excel. The Date Format Like numbers, currency, time and others, the date is a quintessential number format in Excel. Though Excel tries its best to auto-recognize data types, it doesn’t always succeed. To manually apply the date format to a cell or group of cells, [...]

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This tutorial covers how to insert dates in Excel.

The Date Format

Like numbers, currency, time and others, the date is a quintessential number format in Excel.

Though Excel tries its best to auto-recognize data types, it doesn’t always succeed. To manually apply the date format to a cell or group of cells, select the HOME menu, expand the Number dropdown and choose short or long date.

long or short

The difference between short and long date formats is that the latter includes the weekday.
Warning! Applying the date format to inappropriate data will give unexpected results!

If you would like to change the default format of the date, with the order of month, day and year, select “More Number Formats..” under the Number dropdown.

more number formats

At the bottom of the dropdown, More Number Formats allows you to customize the order of the elements in the date. You can also choose a particular date format based on your location.

date format

Note: The location options must be compatible with the language of your machine.

Today’s Date

To insert today’s date, there are two primary functions: NOW() and TODAY(). The former also includes the current time.

now and today

To change the order of the resulting date, follow the steps mentioned earlier to customize the format.

Shortcut: You can also use shortcut “CTRL + ; “ for TODAY() and “CTRL + SHIFT + ;” for NOW().

Auto Populate Dates

Excel treats dates and numbers in almost the same way. Because dates are implemented as serial numbers, you can perform arithmetic operations with them such as auto-populating.

Just as you would auto-populate cells with numbers, select a cell with a date and drag the fill handle through the cells you want to fill.

day auto pop 1

day auto pop 2

The example demonstrates how to fill cells by day increments, but you can also increment by week, month and year. Just follow the same steps that you would to fill cells by day increments, and then select the icon at the bottom right next to the fill handle. On the dropdown list, choose your increment.

month auto pop

month auto pop 2

Fill Dates by Custom Interval

You might want to fill dates and increment by an amount other than one unit of time.

To fill cells with dates by every N number of days, first perform the steps as you would to autofill dates normally. Then in the editing section of the HOME menu, click Fill then Series.

different increment

In the dialog box, select “Linear” and under “Step value”, provide the desired increment.

dialog different increment

Result: The dates will be auto filled every three days.

result month auto

Create a Date from Separate Columns

If you happen to work with Excel data where the year, month and day are in separate columns, you can use the DATE function to merge them into one date.

DATE(YEAR, MONTH, DAY)

separate columns

Note: Months have to be in numeric form.

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Calculate a Running Total in Excel http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/calculate-a-running-total-in-excel http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/calculate-a-running-total-in-excel#respond Sat, 23 Jul 2016 20:58:21 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8432 This tutorial will teach you how to set up and calculate a running total with Excel. To calculate a running total, you’ll need to use the SUM function with a combination of absolute and relative references. Mixed references will allow you to create a growing total that is anchored to the initial value. [...]

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This tutorial will teach you how to set up and calculate a running total with Excel.

Calculate a Running Total with Excel formula

To calculate a running total, you’ll need to use the SUM function with a combination of absolute and relative references. Mixed references will allow you to create a growing total that is anchored to the initial value.

Let’s start with an example to demonstrate:

excel running total calculation
Here is a list of people and the amount they have donated. You want to see howthe total donations grow as each individual contributes his or her donation. This increasing value is the running total.

Running Total Formula

This is how to use the SUM formula: =SUM($Column$Row:ColumnRow)

In the first row, the example use =SUM($C$4:C4). This formula is telling Excel to add all the values from cell C4 to C4, which is only one cell and will give you the answer of $50. As we copy this formula down, Excel will sum C4 to C5, C4 to C6, etc.

absolute reference with running count=

excel function summing total

Absolute vs Relative Cell References

The $ symbols in the formula freeze the cell reference ($C$4) in place. As you copy the formula down, the formula will always start with cell C4. This is called an absolute reference.

The second value in the formula (C4), does not have $s and is therefore a relative reference. A relative reference will change when you copy the formula into the next row.
By creating a mixed cell reference like this, we can create a running total.

Learn more about cell references

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Count if Cells in Range http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/count-if-cells-in-range http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/count-if-cells-in-range#respond Wed, 20 Jul 2016 02:36:56 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8316 This tutorial explains how to count the number of cells containing numbers that fall within a specified range using the COUNTIFS function. COUNTIFS COUNTIFS(range_1,criteria _1,[ range_2,criteria _2],…) range_1 (required): group of cells to count criteria_1 (required): conditions used to count range_2,criteria_2: optional ranges and criteria than can be evaluated. Up to 127 range [...]

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This tutorial explains how to count the number of cells containing numbers that fall within a specified range using the COUNTIFS function.

COUNTIFS

COUNTIFS(range_1,criteria _1,[ range_2,criteria _2],…)

  • range_1 (required): group of cells to count
  • criteria_1 (required): conditions used to count
  • range_2,criteria_2: optional ranges and criteria than can be evaluated. Up to 127 range and criteria pairs can be specified.

How COUNTIFS Works

The COUNTIFS function adds up the number of cells that fall within the ranges specified in the COUNTIF Function.

Let us see how to actually use the function. The following image shows COUNTIFS in action.

countifs-in-action

COUNTIFS Cells in Range Example Description

Let us now look at the formula and try to understand it, piece by piece.

  1. In the first case, we call COUNTIFS in the following manner: =COUNTIFS(B10:B16,”>=10”,B10:B16 ,”<=15”)
    1. B10:B16 tells Excel the range over which we want to count
    2. “>=10”/ “<=15”, the criteria according to which we want to count the cells.
      1. “>=10″ stands for counting any value that is greater than or equal to 10
      2. “<=15” stands for counting any value that is less than or equal to 15
  2. The second case is similar to the first case with only the counting criteria changing to
    1. “>=5”, greater than or equal to -5, i.e. -4,- 3, -2, -1, 0, 1…
    2. “<=5”, less than or equal to 5
  3. The third case is a special case, one which we are very likely to face in a real life situation. This example shows us how to pick values like 5 and 10 from the spreadsheet rather than manually writing them in the formula. To achieve this, we call our function in the following manner: =COUNTIFS(B10:B16,”>=”&B7,B10:B16 ,”<=”&C7)
    1. The only thing changed in our function call as compared to before is our way of providing it our criterion, “>=”&B7/ “<=”&C7. The & sign followed by a cell number tells Excel to look at the value contained in the mentioned cell and use it to substitute it in the formula. Hence,
      1. The &B7 in “>=”&B7, tells excel to look for the value in the cell B7, which in our case is 5, and substitute it in our formula changing it into “>=5”
      2. Similarly &C7 in “<=”&C7 is translated by excel into “<=10”

COUNTIF Function

Before ending this tutorial, I would also like to talk a bit about the COUNTIF function.

Like COUNTIFS, COUNTIF can also be used to count the number of cells meeting specific criteria, but with one very important difference.

The difference between the COUNTIF and COUNTIFS functions is that while the latter function can be used to match multiple criteria in multiple ranges, the former can only match a single criterion in a single range. Multiple COUNTIF calls will be required to achieve this result.

The image below shows how to find the count for the first case in above example using COUNTIF function:

countif vs countifs

EXPLANATION

The COUNTIF function is called as below:

= COUNTIF(B10:B16,”>=10″) – COUNTIF(B10:B16,”>15″)

The “>15” means all values greater than 15 will be counted but not 15 itself.

There are 3 operations happening over here

  1. The first COUNTIF is counting all the values which are greater than or equal to 10
  2. The second COUNTIF is counting all values that are strictly greater than 15
  3. The final operation is subtracting the two counts found above in order to find our final count

 

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Cell References http://www.automateexcel.com/basics/cell-references http://www.automateexcel.com/basics/cell-references#respond Mon, 18 Jul 2016 01:13:18 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8352 In order to make accurate calculations it’s essential to understand how the different types of cell references work. A1 vs. R1C1 References Excel worksheets contain many cells and (by default) each cell is identified by its column letter followed by its row number. This is known as A1-style referencing. Examples: A1, B4, C6 [...]

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In order to make accurate calculations it’s essential to understand how the different types of cell references work.

A1 vs. R1C1 References

Excel worksheets contain many cells and (by default) each cell is identified by its column letter followed by its row number. This is known as A1-style referencing. Examples: A1, B4, C6

a1 ref

A1 reference style

Optionally, you can switch to R1C1 Reference Mode to refer to a cell’s row & column number. Instead of referring to cell A1 you would refer to R1C1 (row 1, column 1). Cell C4 would be referred to R4C3.

r1c1 ref

R1C1 reference style

R1C1-style referencing is extremely uncommon in Excel. Unless you have a good reason you should probably stick to the default A1-style reference mode. However, if you use VBA you will likely encounter this reference style.

Switch to R1C1 Reference Style

To switch the reference style, go to File > Option > Formula. Check the box next to R1C1 reference style.

switch to r1c1

 

Named Ranges

One of the most under-utilized features of Excel is the Named Ranges feature. Instead of referring to a cell (or group of cells) by its cell location (ex B3 or R3C2), you can name that range and simply reference the range name in your formulas.
To name a range:

  1. Select the cell or cells that you wish to name
  2. Click Inside the Range Name Box
  3. Enter your desired name
  4. Hit Enter

named ranges 1         named ranges 2

Now you can reference cell A1 by typing =range_name1 instead. This is very useful when working with large workbooks with multiple worksheets.

named ranges 3

 

Range of Cells

When using Excel’s built in Functions, you may need to reference ranges of cells. Cell ranges appear like this ‘A1:B3’. This reference refers to all cells in between A1 and B3: cells A1,A2,A3, B1, B2, B3.
To select a range of cells when entering a formula:

  • Type in the range (separate the start and end range with a semicolon)
  • Use your mouse to click the first cell reference, hold down the mouse button and drag your desired range.
  • Hold down the shift key and navigate with the arrow keys to select your range

Absolute (Frozen) and Relative References

When entering cell references within formulas, you can use relative or absolute (frozen) references. Relative references will move proportionally when you copy the formula to a new cell. Absolute references will remain unchanged. Let’s look at some examples:

Relative Reference

A relative reference in Excel looks like this

=A1

When you copy and paste a formula with relative references, the relative references will move proportionally. Unless you specify otherwise, your cell references will be relative (unfrozen) by default.
Example: If you copy ‘=A1’ down one row the reference changes to ‘=A2’.

relative ref

Absolute (Frozen) Cell References

If you don’t want your cell references to move when you copy a formula, you can “freeze” your cell references by adding dollar signs ($s) in front of the reference that you want frozen. Now when you copy and paste the formula, the cell reference will remain unchanged. You can choose to freeze the row reference, column reference, or both.

A1: Nothing is frozen

$A1: The column is frozen, but the row is not frozen

A$1: The row is frozen, but the column is not frozen

$A$1: Both the row and column are frozen

Absolute Reference Shortcut

Manually adding in dollar signs ($s) into your formulas isn’t very practical. Instead, while creating your formula, use the F4 key to toggle between absolute/relative cell references.

Absolute Cell Reference Example

When would you actually need to freeze a cell reference? One common example is when you have input cells that are referenced frequently. In the example below, we want to calculate the sales tax for each quantity of menu items. The sales tax is constant across all items, so we will reference the sales tax cell repeatedly.

absolute ref
To find the total sales tax, enter the formula ‘=(B3*C3)*$C$1’ in column D and the copy the formula down.

Mixed Reference

You may have heard of mixed cell references. A mixed reference is when either the row or column reference is locked (but not both).

mixed ref

Mixed Reference

Remember, by using the “F4” key you are able to cycle through your relative, absolute cell references.

Cell References – Inserting & Deleting Rows/Columns

You may be wondering what happens to your cell references when you insert or delete rows/columns?
The cell reference will update automatically to refer to the original cell. This is the case regardless of whether the cell reference is frozen.

3D References

At times, you may need to work with several worksheets with identical patterns of data. Excel allows you to refer to multiple sheets at once without needing to manually enter each worksheet. You can reference a range of sheets similar to how would reference a range of cells. Example ‘Sheet1:Sheet5!A1’ would reference cells A1 on all sheets from Sheet1 to Sheet5.

Let’s walk through an example:

You want to add together the total units sold for each product across all stores. Each store has its own worksheet and all the worksheets have an identical format. You could create a formula similar to this:

3d ref

This is not too difficult with only four worksheets, but what if you had 40 worksheets? Would you really want to manually add each cell reference?

Instead, you can use a 3D reference to reference multiple sheets at once with ease(similar to how you can reference a range of cells).

condensed 3d ref
Be Careful! The order of your worksheets matters. If you move another sheet in between the referenced sheets (StoreA and StoreD) that sheet will be included. Conversely, if you move a sheet outside the range of sheets (before StoreA or after StoreD), it will no longer be included.

Circular Cell Reference

A circular cell reference is when a cell refers back to itself. For example, if the result of cell B1 is used as an input for cell B1 then a circular reference is created. The cell does not need to directly refer to itself There can be intermediate steps.

Example:

circular cell ref 0

In this case, the formula for cell B2 is “A2+A3+B2”. Because you are in cell B2, you may not use B2 in the equation. This would trigger circular reference and the value in cell “B2” will automatically be set to “0”.
Usually circular references are a result of user error, but in there are circumstances in which you may want to use a circular reference. The primary example of using a circular reference is to calculate values iteratively. To do this, you need to go to File > Options > Formulas and Enabled Iterative Calculation:

circular cell iteratiion

External References

At times when calculating data you may need to refer to data outside of your workbook. This is called an external reference (link).

To select an external reference while creating a formula, navigate to the external workbook, and select your reference as you normally would.

To navigate to the other workbook you can use the CTRL + TAB shortcut or go to View > Switch Windows.

ref to external 1

Once you’ve selected the cell, you’ll see that an external reference that looks like this:

ref to external 2

Notice that the workbook name is enclosed by brackets [].

Once you close the referenced workbook, the reference will show the file location:

ref to external 3

When you reopen the workbook containing the external link, you will be prompted to enable automatic updating of links. If you do so, then Excel will open the reference value with the current value of the workbook. Even if it’s closed! Be careful! You may or may not want this.

Named Ranges and External References

What happens to your external cell reference when rows / columns are added or deleted from the reference workbook? If both workbooks are open then the cell references update automatically. However, if both workbooks aren’t open then the cell references won’t update and will no longer be valid. This is a huge concern when linking to external workbooks. Many errors are caused by this.
If you do link to external workbooks, you should name the cell reference with a named range (see previous section for more information). Now your formula will refer to the named range no matter what changes occur on the external workbook.

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How to Disable Scroll Lock in Excel on PC http://www.automateexcel.com/how-to-disable-scroll-lock-in-excel-on-pc http://www.automateexcel.com/how-to-disable-scroll-lock-in-excel-on-pc#respond Sun, 17 Jul 2016 17:09:31 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8332 What is Scroll Lock? The Scroll Lock setting determines what happens when you use the Arrow Keys in Excel. When Scroll Lock is off (the default setting), the Arrow Keys allow you to navigate and select different cells within a worksheet. When Scroll Lock is enabled, the Arrow Keys will instead “scroll” through [...]

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What is Scroll Lock?

The Scroll Lock setting determines what happens when you use the Arrow Keys in Excel. When Scroll Lock is off (the default setting), the Arrow Keys allow you to navigate and select different cells within a worksheet. When Scroll Lock is enabled, the Arrow Keys will instead “scroll” through the active window. You will not be able to navigate to different cells (using the Arrow Keys), instead you will only be able to change the viewing area, similar to clicking the arrows on the Scroll Bars.

scroll bar

There are times when you may want Scroll Lock enabled, though in general, most Excel users only activate this feature by accident.

In this tutorial, you will learn how to check if Scroll Lock has been turned on and how to disable it.

Have you turned on Scroll Lock?

There is a scroll lock button on some keyboards, as well as a scroll lock light, which indicates whether or not the scroll lock button has been pressed and turned on. The scroll lock button is usually on the top right hand corner of the keyboard. If the scroll lock light is turned on, that means that scroll lock is active. If you do not have a scroll lock button and light on your keyboard, you will need to enable the scroll lock status in Excel. If Scroll Lock is on and the Scroll Lock status is enabled in the status bar, the status bar will display the words Scroll Lock in the bottom-left corner of the screen. Though if Scroll Lock is NOT enabled in the status bar, it may still be on but you will not be aware.

To make sure the visual display of Scroll Lock is enabled, right click the status bar. The customize status bar menu will pop up. Make sure the Scroll Lock option is checked. Again, this is only checking the option to SHOW you in the status bar whether or not Scroll Lock is on, not actually turning Scroll Lock on or off.

customize-bar-menu

Now, when Scroll Lock is on, it will display on the bottom of your Excel screen.

status bar

How to Tell if Scroll Lock is Enabled

  1. If “Scroll Lock” is showing in the bottom-left corner of the Excel window, then YES, scroll lock is enabled. If you do not see “Scroll Lock,” it is NOT enabled.
  1. If you feel that Scroll Lock may be enabled, but you do not see the words in the bottom-left corner, ensure that the steps have been taken to enable the visual display as mentioned above.

How to Disable Scroll Lock

  1. Your keyboard has a Scroll Lock Key, simply press this key to turn it off. The Scroll Lock message will disappear, and you will be able to change the active cell.
  1. Your keyboard may not have a Scroll Lock Key. In which case, open the search menu on your computer and type “On-Screen Keyboard.” Go back to Excel with the keyboard displayed, and hit the Scroll Lock key, “ScrLk,” and this should turn it off.

on screen keyboard

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How to Install the Data Analysis Toolpak http://www.automateexcel.com/data-analysis-tools/data-analysis-toolpak http://www.automateexcel.com/data-analysis-tools/data-analysis-toolpak#comments Sun, 17 Jul 2016 03:14:51 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8301 This tutorial will demonstrate how to install the Data Analysis Toolpak add-in in Excel for both Mac and PC. For PC Users: Click on the File tab on the top left, then select Options.        Click Add-ins. Where it says Manage at the bottom, select Excel Add-ins from the drop-down menu [...]

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This tutorial will demonstrate how to install the Data Analysis Toolpak add-in in Excel for both Mac and PC.

For PC Users:

Click on the File tab on the top left, then select Options.

pc-users-file      pc-users-options

Click Add-ins. Where it says Manage at the bottom, select Excel Add-ins from the drop-down menu and click Go.

pc users add ins

You should have a pop-up window on your screen; make sure Analysis ToolPak is checked.

pc-users-toolpak-select

If Analysis ToolPak does not appear as one of the Available add-ins, then click Browse to locate it. Click Yes to install the pack.

You should now be able to access the Data Analysis command under the Data tab.

pc users data analysis

For Mac Users:

In the top menu bar, navigate to Tools > Add-ins.

mac-users-tools

You should have a pop-up window on your screen; make sure Analysis ToolPak is checked.

If Analysis ToolPak does not appear as one of the Available add-ins, then click Browse to locate it. Click Yes to install the pack.

mac users add ins

mac users access data analysis

You should now be able to access the Data Analysis command under the Data tab.

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Sales Funnel Chart http://www.automateexcel.com/charts/sales-funnel-chart http://www.automateexcel.com/charts/sales-funnel-chart#respond Sun, 17 Jul 2016 02:56:43 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8267 What is a Sales Funnel Chart? Funnel charts are usually used to represent a process’s stages and their outputs. A Sales Funnel Chart does this with sales. Like the name entails, the chart looks like a funnel made up of stacked bars, as shown below. Other Funnel Charts There are many other uses [...]

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What is a Sales Funnel Chart?

Funnel charts are usually used to represent a process’s stages and their outputs. A Sales Funnel Chart does this with sales.

Like the name entails, the chart looks like a funnel made up of stacked bars, as shown below.

sales funnel chart

Other Funnel Charts

There are many other uses for Funnel Charts.

  • Number of employees at each job level (entry-level, experienced, manager, executive, etc.)
  • Recruitment process (applied, shortlisted, initial interview, etc.)
  • Order fulfillment (orders received, orders processed, orders approved, etc.)

Sales Funnel Chart Example

To make the process easier to understand, here’s a scenario:

Your goal is to sell a product that caters to a certain demographic, and the sales process has multiple stages. You can make a Sales Funnel Chart to depict the number of people that make it through each stage of the process, with each bar representing a stage, and the width of each bar representing the number of people that pass that stage.

Here’s an example of a sequence of stages:

  1. Research: Start off with about 5000 people to research.
  2. Qualification: About 3400 of these people fit the demographic you are looking for.
  3. Presentation: You send invites to these 3400 people to come to a sales presentation where you can pitch your product. 2700 people decide to come.
  4. Interest: Out of these 2700 people, 1500 stay to express interest in buying the product.
  5. Close: 800 people actually buy the product.

From here you have 6 main steps:

Step 1: Organize Data

To start off, create three columns.

The first column would consist of your stage names. For the sake of simplicity, let’s just stick with Stage 1, Stage 2, Stage 3, Stage 4, and Stage 5.

Label the second column Spacer (this will be used to center the bars). Keep the rest of this column blank for now.

Label the third column with your desired unit of output. In this example, I will use Stage Winners. Now list the number of units for each stage (in this case, the number of people that make it to each stage).

It should look a little something like this:

funnel - chart 1

In the Spacer column, we’ll be using Excel formulas!

Skip Stage 1, and start on Stage 2.

Each row’s equation will be slightly different, and is best shown through example.

In Stage 2’s Spacer box, type:

=(MAX($C$2:$C$6)-C3)/2

The =(MAX($C$2:$C$6) part stays consistent throughout the column because it selects the max number in the Stage Winner’s column.

Then you need to subtract the box coordinates of Stage Winner’s at whatever Stage you are on.

Divide the whole thing by 2 to center the bar.

Use the numbers I listed under Stage Winners first as a way to check if you are using the equations correctly. Your output should look like this:

funnel chart 2

Step 2: Create a Stacked Bar Chart

Now select the data including the labels for the vertical axis

selected data for vertical axis

Go to Charts tab à Bar à Stacked Bar Chart.

create a stacked bar chart1

create a stacked bar chart 2

Click that, and now you should have something that looks a little like this:

reverse funnel

Now you must be thinking, “Wait, isn’t this supposed to be upside down?”

No worries, we just have to reverse the order of the categories.

Step 3: Reverse Order of Categories

Right click the vertical axis (the one with the Stage Names) and select Format Axis.

reverse order of categories 1

There should be a checkbox that says Categories in reverse order”, so click that.

reverse order categories 2

Now your stages should be in the same order as how they’re listed on your chart.

reverse order categories 3

Do you see how spaced out everything is? We want to get rid of that.

Step 4: Change Gap Width to 0%

To do this, we want to get the gap width to 0% so that it looks more like a connected funnel than a couple bars floating above each other.

Just right click any of the bars and select “Format Data Series”.

change gap to 0

From there change the Gap Width to 0%.

change gap 0 1

Now your chart should look like this:

change gap 0 2

Now we want to make the spacer bar transparent so that only the data we want analyzed would appear.

Step 5: Set Spacer Bar Color to No Fill

Right click any of the bars in the Spacer series and select “Format Data Series”.

spacer-bar-no-fill

 

Change the Fill Color in the series options to No Fill.

space-bar-no-fill-2

Your chart should now look like this:

spacer-bar-no-fill-3

Step 6. Customize your Chart

Now here is the fun part!

You can customize your funnel chart so that it looks presentable for all your presentation needs.

To get to this chart:

sales funnel chart

I did the following:

  1. Changed the fill color from red to blue (Right Click Data Series à Format Data Series à Fill)
  2. Removed the shadowing (Right Click à Format Data Series à De-Select Shadow)
  3. Changed the outline to a different color from the fill (Right Click Data Series à Format Data Series)
  4. Removed the horizontal axis units (Right Click Horizontal Axis à Delete)
  5. Removed graph lines (Right Click Gridlines à Delete)
  6. Added data labels to the middle of the bars (Right Click Data Series à Add Data Labels)
  7. Added a chart title (Charts à Chart Layout à Chart Title à Title Above Chart)
  8. Removed the legend. (Right Click Legend à Delete)

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Working with Page Breaks in Excel & VBA http://www.automateexcel.com/page-breaks-excel-vba http://www.automateexcel.com/page-breaks-excel-vba#respond Tue, 21 Jun 2016 02:34:30 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8147 If you don’t manually set Page Breaks, Excel will do it’s best to set appropriate Page Breaks. However, if you’ve ever tried to print an Excel spreadsheet, you know it generally does not do a good job. Any time you print a spreadsheet you should review and edit the Page Breaks before printing. [...]

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If you don’t manually set Page Breaks, Excel will do it’s best to set appropriate Page Breaks. However, if you’ve ever tried to print an Excel spreadsheet, you know it generally does not do a good job.

Any time you print a spreadsheet you should review and edit the Page Breaks before printing.

Page Break View Mode

Because page breaks are not shown by default in Excel, you will want to switch to Page Break Preview view mode in order to work effectively with them.

To switch from Normal View to Page Break Preview, activate the View Ribbon Menu. Then select Page Break Preview (ALT > W > I).

page break preview mode

Below is an example of what the view looks like. A dashed line represents an automatic page break whereas solid lines stand for manual page breaks.
insert horizontal row page break excel vba

Tip: To go back to Normal View, go to View Ribbon > Normal (directly next to Page Break Preview) (ALT > W > L).

Insert Page Breaks

To insert a row (horizontal) page break, highlight the row directly below where you want to place the break. Then navigate to the Layout Ribbon Menu and select Breaks > Insert Page Break (ALT > P > B > I).
insert column page break excel vba

Result:
insert horizontal row page break excel vba
Tip: The SHIFT + SPACE shortcut allows you to conveniently select an entire row.

Follow the same steps to insert a column (vertical) Page Break. Select the column directly to the right of where you want to place your break. Then go to Page Layout > Breaks > Insert Page Break (ALT > P > B > I).

insert column vertical page break excel vba

Tip: The CTRL + SPACE shortcut allows you to conveniently select an entire column.

Delete Page Break

To delete page breaks you can use almost exact same steps as if you were to insert one. Select the row below or column to the right of the page break and perform these steps:

Under the Page Layout Ribbon Menu, select Breaks then Remove Page Break (ALT > P > B > R)

remove column page breaks excel vba
Note: Automatic page breaks cannot be deleted

Move Page Breaks

If you happen to mess up where you placed your breaks, don’t fret. You can simply move them to the desired location.

Activate Page Break Preview (ALT > W > I), and simply hover over any page break lines until the <-> shows up then drag it to the desired location.

Warning: If you happen to move an automatic page break, it will turn into its manual counterpart.

Reset Page Breaks

Sometimes, you want to reset all of the Page Breaks in a worksheet..

On the ribbon, head back to where you would insert a page break and select the reset option (ALT > P > B > A)

reset all page breaks excel vba

Hide Page Breaks in Normal View

Page breaks may appear in Normal View Mode; they can be useful or an eye sore. To hide them, follow these steps:

Click the File tab on the ribbon then select Options on the left menu:

excel page break options

Then navigate to the Advanced subtab in the left menu. Scroll down to Display options for this worksheet and unselect Show Page Breaks.

remove page breaks from normal view mode excel

Page Breaks – VBA

Everything mentioned above can also be accomplished using VBA using these code examples:

‘Add Row Page Break
Worksheets("Sheet1").Rows(40).PageBreak = xlPageBreakManual

‘Add Column Page Break
Worksheets("Sheet1").Columns("Z").PageBreak = xlPageBreakManual

‘Clear Row Page Break
Worksheets("Sheet1").Rows(40).PageBreak = xlPageBreakNone

‘Clear Column Page Break’
Worksheets("Sheet1").Columns("Z").PageBreak = xlPageBreakNone

‘Set Activesheet to Page Break Preview Mode
ActiveWindow.View = xlPageBreakPreview

‘Restore Activesheet to Normal View Mode
ActiveWindow.View = xlNormalView

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How to Calculate Age in Excel http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/calculate-age http://www.automateexcel.com/formulas/calculate-age#respond Tue, 14 Jun 2016 02:49:31 +0000 http://www.automateexcel.com/?p=8090 This tutorial covers how to calculate age in Excel. Calculate Exact Age To calculate the exact age of a person, you want to calculate the difference between the current date (or any other desired date) and the birth date. You might think that you could simply take the difference in days between the current date [...]

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This tutorial covers how to calculate age in Excel.

calculate age in excel yearfrac

Calculate Exact Age

To calculate the exact age of a person, you want to calculate the difference between the current date (or any other desired date) and the birth date.

You might think that you could simply take the difference in days between the current date and the birth date divided by 365: (Current Date – Birth Date) / 365. This answer is close, however, this ignores leap years (Remember that every 4 years, February has an extra day and there are 366 days in that year).

(Current Date – Birth Date)/365.25 will generally produce a more accurate result, however it’s not as precise as it could be. Instead use the YEARFRAC Function:

YEARFRAC Function

=YEARFRAC(start_date, end_date)

The YEARFRAC Function returns a decimal year difference between two dates.

Look at an example:
calculate age of person in excel

=YEARFRAC(B5,TODAY())

Note: The TODAY Function: TODAY() returns today’s date (6/13/2016 in our example)

Calculate Rounded (Truncated) Age

The previous answer was in decimal format (25.59 years). However, we generally would refer to this person as 25 years old, not 25.59 years old.

You can use the INT or TRUNC Functions to simply trim off of decimals (note: you can also use the FLOOR Function, however the Floor Function requires an additional input)

calculate exact age in excel

=INT(YEARFRAC(C5,TODAY()))

Dates in Excel

How does Excel do this so easily?

Allow me to show you a secret of how dates work in Excel. Dates in Excel are stored as a value representing the number of days since the first date in Excel.

See for yourself by formatting a date into number formatting in the Home Ribbon.
calculate rounded age in excel

Or by using the shortcut CTRL + SHIFT + 1

November 8, 1990 is 33,185 days since the first day of Excel, the imaginary date of January 0, 1900. So the date 11/8/1990 is stored as the number 33,185. As for dates before the first date, that is a whole another problem for another post!

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